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20121224
20130101
STATION
KQED (PBS) 3
KRCB (PBS) 3
CSPAN 2
CSPAN2 2
KQEH (PBS) 1
WETA 1
WJZ (CBS) 1
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English 13
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)
community. >> we respect all religions, but they did not have the respect of our muslims to provide as a regular, legal mosque for our workshop. >> the shadow of a now distant past. no mosques have been built in athens since christian greece gained independence in 1832, the omi e.u. capital without. but could that change? this was the site chosen for the first mosque. but previous promises have come to nothing in there is a financial crisis. >> there was a fear in the greek society about the construction of a mosque. we must overcome these fears. it is the commitment of the greek state about the construction and commitment. >> there is still resistance. well over 90% of greeks are orthodox christians. while many accept the moscow plan, many are opposed, resentful of mass migration here. >> greece fought hundreds of centuries of terrorism -- of tyranny by muslims. we totally oppose this. >> pride in their own faith is clear, but can they resist the respect of the other? this is a country where religion is intrinsic to national identity, where church and state are intimately linked. t
the rooftops. and they're the perfect symbol for his multicultural city. >> love animals knows no religion or creed. this hobby is shared by kurds, turks, and arabs. >> from pierce said this to feats of light, no where else are people so passionate about pigeons as in turkey. >> that brings us to the end of this last edition of "european journal" in 2012. until next year, happy new year from all of us in brussels. bye for now. captioned by the national captioning institute --www.ncicap.org--
and said it is as much about economic inequality as religion. she traces much today's problems back to ferdinand marcos. >> the government insiitute a lot of government policies that suppressed the muslim population. and after that, the military really violated human. >> reporter: that sowed the seeds for radicalization by some rebel fighters. by the 1990s a regional al qaeda affiliate began to thrive. >> to even help you understand why you're oppressed. >> reporter: are they growing? >> as far as we're concernedr: it's not growing. >> reporter: army major carlospe sole says they have largely been contained as a military threat in part helped by u.s. advisers who remain in the region. philippine officials also note that the peace treaty gives them more autonomy and control over resources. factions on either side remain unhappy with the peace process and there are frequent localized clashes, and trust continues to be in short ply. that's a void both the militaryy and the main rebel group the milf, say foreign civilians can fill effectively. >> only an armed civiliani protects the mon
a huge community. >> we respect all religions but they did not have the respect of our muslims to provide as a regular, legal mosque for our workshop. >> the shadow of a now distant past. no mosques have been built in athens since christian greece gained independence in 1832 the omi e.u. capital without. but could that change? this was the site chosen for the first mosque. but previous promises have come to nothing in there is a financial crisis. >> there was a fear in the greek society about the construction of a mosque. we must overcome these fears. it is the commitment of the greek state about the construction and commitment. >> there is still resistance. well over 90% of greeks are orthodox christians. while many accept the moscow plan, many are opposed resentful of mass migration here. >> greece fought hundreds of centuries of terrorism -- of tyranny by muslims. we totally oppose this. >> pride in their own faith is clear, but can they resist the respect of the other? this is a country where religion is intrinsic to national identity, where church and state are intimately linked. the
of religion with the added security argue the application of organized violence because they often forget that fact. the non-westerners often do, so he says it is justifiable that we can have this policy towards iraq even though half a million children have died and clinton passes the laws that basically gives the opportunity for bush to go further after with the invasion of iraq so we see the continuum, that is a part of the point that we are making. it is and democrats versus republicans we see it with the lines running you can see 1846 with mexico but we are choosing from 1899 up through iraq and afghanistan and yemen. >> it is a way of life, so in some ways -- >> we're standing on the shoulders of a lot of great americans and it's not really the diversity offices. some are told in the public schools and it is untold to the popular audience and people that get their history from television and so that is what we try to challenge the they don't know much history and they say that there were some at understanding u.s. history than they are understanding the math and science with to this
said the west won the world not by the superiority of its idead of values or religion but by the superiority of its application of organized violence. and westerners often forget that fact. nonwesterners never do. so albright, justifiable that we can have this policy toward iraq, even though a half million died, and clinton passes the law that basically gives the opportunity for bush to go further with it when bush, after 9/11, with the invasion of iraq. so, we see a continuum. that's part of the point we're making. it's not democrats versus republicans. foreign policy is bipartisan and we see it as this -- these lines running from 1898 -- you can say 1846 with mexico -- but we're tracing from 1899 up to iraq and afghanistan and yemen, and to the current administration. >> a lot like great historian williams who argues empire is a way of life. you call your book "untold history of the united states now now and in some ways williams -- >> we're following that. that's been on -- standing on on the showereds of a lot of great historian. this is not really untold to unive
and personal liberty? why does the use of religion to support a social gospel and preemptive wars, both of which require of their terrance to use violence or the threat of violence, go unchallenged -- authoritarians to use of violence or the threat of violence, go unchallenged? why do we allow the government and federal reserve to disseminate false information dealing with both economics and foreign policy? why is democracy held in such high esteem, when it is the enemy of the minority, and makes all rights relative to the dictates of the majority? why should anyone be surprised that congress has no credibility, since there is such a disconnect between what politicians say and what they do? is there any explanation for all of the deception, and happiness, fear of the future, loss of confidence in our leaders -- unhappiness, fear of the future, loss of confidence in our leaders? yes, there is. the negative perceptions are logical. identification of the problems and recognizing becausthe causew the proper changes to come more easily. we should have trust in ourselves, less in the governme
will on the historical link between religion and politics. at 10:50, singer-songwriter and james taylor, on c-span. >> the senate returns to legislative business on thursday and house as a performance session scheduled that day. the senate is in at 10:00 a.m. eastern for work on two bills. the first would extend provisions of the foreign intelligence surveillance act. the other is a relief package for those affected by hurricane sandy. you can follow live coverage of the senate on our companion network, c-span2. house members are on standby as negotiations continue on the so- called fiscal cliff. >host: we turn our attention to unemployment insurance and health benefits could be impacted. joining us is josh boak. when we are talking about unemployment insurance, what specific programs are talking about here? guest: unemployment insurance is a combination of federal and state program. usually last 62 weeks. it is that extension beyond that six months time frame that we are talking about as part of the fiscal cliff tops. that is what automatically expires. we know that it costs about $30 billio
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)